Oregon Economy
The Oregon Economy is one of the fastest growing economies in the nation. With important and growing industries in manufacturing, apparel, and green technologies, Oregon has a solid base in vital markets that will continue to be of great value to the economy moving forward.

Oregon Total GSP

Total gross state product is the sum of all products sold and distributed in Oregon during a year. This is usually used to indicate the size of the economy, which includes all private sector transactions along with government spending such as school spending, infrastructure spending, and health care spending. Although the economy took a slight dip during the recession, the economy has been increasing steadily over the last few years.
GSP Growth

GSP growth measures how much total GSP has increases from one year to the next. This measure shows the state of the economy as opposed to the size. The state of the economy is a vital factor because it shows, especially after coming out of a recession, how fast the economy is recovering. In this regard, Oregon had the 2nd highest growth rate of all states in 2011. This shows that the Oregon economy has been one of the fastest economies to start to recover from the recession, and is in great position to improve in the future. This prospect for growth will help make Oregon more competitive and could sway more companies and high skilled workers to relocate or expand into Oregon.
GSP Per Capita

GSP per capita shows how much GSP the state has per person. This statistic is used to show the efficiency of the economy. This is an equalizer in terms of big states and small states, and can show how effective the economy is at maximizing its labor force and machinery to produce more output per person. As of 2011, the Oregon GSP per capita was ranked 11th in the nation. This shows that, per person, Oregon has an above average efficiency but has room for improvement in this respect. The trend has also moved upwards and recently overtook Washington which historically has had a larger GSP per capita than Oregon.
Oregon Employment
One of the biggest problems facing Oregon right now is that so many of its workers are currently out of work. Oregon's unemployment rate is one of the highest in the country, however it is important to see where the jobs are located in the economy and what industries have the highest potential for growth in terms of employment.

Unemployment

At 8.9 as of August 2012, Oregon's unemployment has lagged behind most states since the recession hit. This could be caused by a decline in housing and other related industries, or by an ineffective government response to the recession. This is one of the biggest challenges for the Oregon economy moving forward and must be discussed by our legislature in the near future in order to turn this number around, and put Oregonians back to work.
Household Income

Household Income has been one of the indicators in Oregon that has made the best improvements since the recession hit, almost back to pre-recession levels. However, ranked as 23rd in the nation, Oregon has a lot of improvements it could make to increase these numbers and give middle income families more financial security and purchasing power. This starts with increasing the number of high skill jobs available in Oregon, and moving towards our 40-40-20 goal for education which would create a more skilled workforce to fill these job vacancies.
Employment by Business Size

Due to Oregon's high levels of manufacturing companies, our employment is largely reliant on big businesses. With over 3/4 of our private sector employment coming from businesses with over 20 employees it is important for us to attract these types of companies to Oregon and to implement legislation that is friendly to businesses that are such a large part of our economy.
Oregon Exports
The Oregon economy has always had a very important export industry. Although recently the trend has shifted from logging and forestry exports to being mainly dominated by the high tech manufacturing industry, exports remain an important component of the Oregon economy.

Exports as % of GSP

The Oregon Economy is closely tied with its exports. Almost 10% of all GSP comes from Oregon exports. Although this lags significantly behind Washington's 18%, it remains a significant portion of our total GSP and should be considered an important factor when discussing Oregon's policy towards bringing in and keeping businesses with large export potential.
Export Employment

Export employment shows how much of Oregon's employment is being employed directly by the export market. This percentage does not, however, include all of the employees that work for companies that export from Oregon. If this percentage were to include all employees of companies that export it would be significantly higher. Although Oregon is below Washington in this figure, more employees are employed by exports here than in most of our geographically competitive states, and also the United States as a whole.
Oregon Exports by Sector

Oregon's export market is dominated by the manufacturing sector. Led by the high technology sector which manufactures computer and electronic products, the future of the Oregon export economy will have a large emphasis on the manufacturing sector. Besides agricultural products, that consist of all farming and forestry exports, manufacturing in chemical, machinery, and transportation make up the other large export sectors in the Oregon economy.
Key Sectors


EVRW 2014: Employees Vote Toolkit

America works better when Americans vote.

This September 22-26th, we are participating in Employee Voter Registration Week (EVRW). EVRW is an initiative organized by the business community to encourage employee voter registration. We have joined this effort in hopes that, together, we can reach our goal of having 100,000 voter forms downloaded during EVRW.

Our belief is that, when employees vote, the business community’s voice is heard. Don't let someone make the decision for you. Get registered. Get out the vote.

About EVRW

In important elections, every vote counts. America works better when Americans vote, but Americans can't vote unless they are registered. There are millions of employees across the US who have not registered to vote. People don't register because they forget, or it's too complicated or time-consuming, or perhaps they have moved and just haven't updated their voter registration.

The truth is that registering to vote is simple and doesn't take much time or effort.

Employee Voter Registration Week is an effort to make a dent in the number of unregistered citizens across the country. During this week, companies and associations from the business community will join together in an effort to encourage voter registration among their employees. The initiative will not tell employees how to vote or who to vote for, but instead aims to serve as a resource to help employers educate their employees about the issues that are important to their businesses and a resource for providing key deadlines, voter registration, and polling location information.

Employee Voter Registration Week is powered by BIPAC, a nonpartisan, membership-driven, organization dedicated to increasing the political effectiveness of America's business community.

For more information on Employee Voter Registration Week, contact BIPAC at info@bipac.org

 

EMPLOYER RESOURCES

Click here to download 2014 ERVW Messages

Click here to download 2014 ERVW Timeline

Click here to the Voter Registration Drive Guide


EVRW Multimedia Collateral


Visit www.employeevotes.org

 


Use our common hashtag, #employeesvote to add your voice to the conversation.

 

Register to Vote
Enter your zip code to start


 

Minimum Wage in Oregon: Which Oregonians are Impacted by Increases in the Minimum Wage?

Just last January, Oregon’s minimum wage rose to $9.10 an hour, and that might just be the beginning. So what’s that mean to you?  After all, you don’t work for minimum wage.

Well, maybe it means a lot.

Despite the fact that Oregon now has the second highest minimum wage in the entire nation (just behind Washington State at $9.32) Oregon policymakers are talking about raising it even higher.

You might be surprised to find out how further increases will affect Oregon workers and businesses.

Let’s look at some facts.

First, a change in the minimum wage affects a small portion of the total workforce. Out of Oregon’s workforce of over 1.7 million people, about 5.5% of workers make minimum wage and of those, more than half are tipped employees - meaning that they often make far more than minimum wage.  

Second, people often assume that many minimum wage workers are full-time employees. That’s wrong. In Oregon, only 1.4% of full-time hourly workers make minimum wage. And across the U.S., only 2% of full-time hourly workers make minimum wage, while 10% of part-time hourly workers make the minimum wage.

When it comes to being the breadwinner, the vast majority of minimum wage workers do not have families to support. In 80% of U.S. households with children, and in which someone earns minimum wage, that job accounts for less than 20% of total household income. That means that in most of those households, the minimum wage job is supplementing income earned from higher paying jobs.

So it shouldn’t be a surprise to learn that workers in minimum wage jobs are somewhat transitory; for example, almost half of all such workers are employed by the food service industry, where, according to the Bureau of Labor and Statistics, they stay at a job for a median of only 2.3 years.  This is half as long as the overall median job tenure of 4.6 years.  With such a short tenure, food service industry jobs can be the precursor to better, higher-paying jobs that could only be obtained after a worker has gained experience.

So what does this total up to? A higher minimum wage means that workers cost more and businesses may not be able to hire as many employees, particularly those who are inexperienced and new to the workforce - the very people that really need that first job.